Student grantees call for peace promotion through education

KORONADAL CITY, December 04, 2018 — Pinanganak ako sa giyera. Hindi nakakatulong ang conflict kasi maraming bata ang hindi nakakapag-aral dahil natatakot sila sa mga terorista.”

(I was born in war. Conflict does not help promote education because children are scared of the terrorists.)

This was the sentiment of 19-year-old Bailyn Nasa, a first-year college student residing in Barangay Tee in Datu Salibo, Maguindanao.

Nasa is one of the 100 student grantees of the College Education Assistance Project (CEAP) who underwent a training on peace formation in this city on December 1, 2018.

The training was meant to equip young peacebuilders with knowledge, skills, and tools that they can share in building a culture of peace and nonviolence. It also serves as an opportunity for the youth to become peace champions in their respective communities and universities.

Sabi ko mag-aaral ako nang mabuti para kahit papaano may maitulong ako sa lugar namin,” Nasa said.

(I told myself that I will study well in order to contribute something to my community.)

Education was also the same means that 24-year-old Abbie Usman, also a first year college student and a resident of Tukanalipao, Mamasapano, thought of when asked how he can contribute to peace promotion.

Gagawa ako ng paraan para makapag-hikayat ng mga katulad ko na makapag-aral. Pero hindi ko kaya mag-isa — kailangan ko ng makakasama,” Usman said.

(I will make a way to encourage youth like me to pursue their education. But I cannot do this alone — I need help.)

Through this peace formation, students were assisted in mitigating the increase in their vulnerabilities to violent extremism and averting their exposure to criminal activities.

Simula pagkabata ko, wala na akong naranasang peace sa amin. Matagal na ang isang linggo na walang putukan,” Usman said as he highlighted the violence that occurs in his community.

(I never experienced peace in our community since I was young. The longest period with no gunfire was one week.)

In addition to CEAP’s peace promotion sessions, the students were also provided with transitional cash assistance to support their education.

In his opening remarks, Area Management Team Head Jake Misuari encouraged the students not just to listen during the training but also to actively participate and share their learnings to their peers afterward.

Sikapin niyong isagawa ang lahat ng natutunan ninyo dito sa CEAP. Kahit isa lang na makakapag-bigay ng positive impact sa inyong buhay. At sana, makatulong ito para kayo ay maging youth peace champions,” he said.

(Do your best to apply what you learn here in CEAP. Even just one lesson that will have a positive impact on your lives. And I hope this can help you become youth peace champions.)

Nasa and Usman were just two of the 1,200 college students CEAP has assisted. They are also among the hundreds of thousand affected by armed conflict.

Parang immune na kami sa giyera. Pero nangangarap pa rin ako na sana ‘yong lugar namin ay maging peaceful na. Kahit panandalian lang. O kahit pang-habang buhay na sana,” Nasa said.

(I feel like we’re already immune to conflict. But I still hope that our community can be peaceful even just for a short time. Or hopefully for a lifetime.)

CEAP is an assistance project for underprivileged college students in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), with special consideration for those directly affected by the Marawi siege. ###

By | December 4th, 2018|NAPWPS, News|0 Comments

Samar women and youth took active roles on peace and development

Congregations based here in Samar convened representatives of the women and youth sectors from various parts of the island on 25 September as part of the series of activities in line with the celebration of the National Peace Consciousness Month.

The Samar Island Women Action Network (SWAN) for Peace and Development on Monday conducted a forum that discussed the issues being faced by Samar women and proposed recommendations on how the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) – in upholding the principles of National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security (NAPWPS) – can help alleviate their struggles.

Amongst the challenges raised were livelihood opportunities and their funding, lack of access roads, child labor, disaster preparedness, security vulnerabilities and lack of health facilities on far-flung areas.

SWAN President Myra Tambor expressed her gratitude that OPAPP considered Samar as the fourth stop for their ‘Peace Buzz’, a symbolic caravan that travels on different areas from Luzon to Mindanao to advocate the culture of peace.

Ang maganda sa congress na ‘to, sila [women] mismo dito sa community sector ang nag-identify ng mga problema nila. ‘Yong pag-identify ng issues nila na hihingan ng solusyon mula sa OPPAP at marinig ni Secretary [Dureza], malaking bagay na po ‘yon sa’min,” Tambor said.

In addition to women empowerment, Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process Secretary Jesus Dureza also acknowledged on his keynote message the vital role of youth on the peace process and implementation.

“‘Yong beneficiaries, ang makaka-enjoy ng trabaho natin ngayon for peace ay ang mga kabataan. The reason why involved kayo [youth], ay dahil kaming mga matatanda na are like old dogs who are difficult to learn new tricks. Kaya napaka-halaga na ‘yong mga kabataan natin will really work for your own future, especially for peace,” Secretary Dureza stated.

The women and youth forums had a total of 118 and 110 participants respectively from 15 municipalities of Samar Island. The two groups were merged for an oath-taking ceremony as Peace Ambassadors on the latter part of the program, led by Miss World Philippines Top 10 and Peace Ambassadress Cristina Marie Coloma.

 

When advocates for Women, Peace and Security transcend their regular job

Not just advocates, but champions.

This was how the first batch of Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Speaker’s Bureau was described by Undersecretary Diosita T. Andot of the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process (OPAPP) during the Training of Trainers held on 31 July to 03 August in Tagaytay City.

Norilyn Rivera is a planning officer at the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) for nine years but in the course of her service, supporting for women’s rights was more than just that.

“Ang motivation ko talaga is maraming tao ang naghihintay ng serbisyo ng gobyerno. It’s really a commitment na eto na, nabibigyan ako ng opportunity for learning. Kailangan kong ibalik ‘yon kasi maraming naghihintay,” Rivera shared when asked about her insights during the workshop.

Commissioner Aisha Malayang of the National Commission on Muslim Filipinos (NCMF) also shared how her personal experience brought her closer to embrace the vision conveyed in the National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security (NAPWPS).

“I am a convert to Islam in 2003 and when I changed my faith, kasabay din do’n ‘yong sandamakmak na discrimination. Nandiyan ‘yong tanggalin ako sa trabaho dahil naka-hijab ako … so I can resonate well with others who share the same narrative,” she stated.

Rivera and Malayang were just some of the 64 trainers capacitated during the four-day workshop. The activity started off from a story-telling about the concepts and history of NAPWPS since its development in 2010, down to the formation of a “solidarity circle’’ symbolizing the firm commitment that all participants took oath on its last day.

Genesis of NAPWPS

Academic analyses identified the Philippines as the first country in Asia to adopt a National Action Plan, highlighting its uniqueness on the long-term implementation spanning from 2010 to 2016.

Its formulation was a result of a collaborative effort between the government and various civil society organizations since 2007. In 2010, Executive Order No. 865 was signed leading to the creation of the National Steering Committee on Women, Peace and Security and on that same year, the first NAPWPS framework was launched.

Further enhancements focusing on the streamline of NAPWPS action points and indicators resulted in the crafting of its second generation framework in 2014. This was subsequently used in the 2015 baseline research on the implementation of NAPWPS initiatives entitled: “Women, Peace and Security: A Study to Implement United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325”.

Now on its third generation, the new NAPWPS framework integrated the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), CEDAW General Recommendation 30, and 2015 Global Study on the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 that underscore women’s leadership and participation on the peace process as well as its strengthened mechanisms for women’s protection during and after conflict.

Ways moving forward

However, the capacity building was just one step closer to a bigger WPS platform. Foreseen challenges on its information dissemination down to the local government units, budget allocations, monitoring and on-the-ground implementation were among the points raised during the workshop. Nonetheless, the WPS champions asserted their determination on the successful rollout of the new framework.

For instance, NCMF Commissioner Malayang shared how their agency will take part an “active role in the advancement of the NAPWPS agenda” as well as acknowledging the importance of cascading it down to the regions especially to those with conflict situations.

The same sentiment was shared by Rivera, who expressed that harmonizing the principles of NAPWPS into the mission of DSWD would help them further understand the sensitivities and situations being experienced by women especially on fragile areas.

“Kung ie-espouse mo ‘yong NAPWPS sa GAD (Gender and Development) makikita mo na bibigyan mo siya [women] ng livelihood and economic opportunities, pero ang lensing mo on WPS, bibigyan mo rin siya ng venue to participate sa usapan kung paano mare-resolve ang conflict na ‘to,” Rivera said.

The workshop concluded in positive outlooks as Jasmin Nario-Galace, one of the workshop facilitators, shared her hope in the advocacy that the WPS champions would be pursuing.

“The women have always been marginalized, always been thought as victims, their voices invisible. It’s high time that we highlight their agency: that they are seen not just as survivors – but also agents of peace,” she said.

Other participants from this activity were representatives from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Department of Interior and Local Government, Philippine National Police, Philippine National Police Academy, Department of National Defense, General Staff College, Armed Forces of the Philippines, AFP Peace Process and Development Office, AFP Peacekeeping Operations Center, AFP Civil Military Operations, Philippine Army, Philippine Air Force, Philippine Navy, Government Arsenal, National Defense College Of The Philippines, Philippine Veterans Affairs Office, Veterans Memorial Medical Center, Department of Justice, Philippine Commission on Women, Department of Labor and Employment – International Labor Affairs Bureau, Department of Health, Department of Agriculture, Department of Agrarian Reform and OPAPP. ###

Women’s Public Leadership in Peace

WOMEN’S PUBLIC LEADERSHIP IN PEACE. Women leaders from the Bangsamoro and indigenous communities in the Philippines welcome their sisters from 15 countries in Asia and Europe as they gather to exchange stories and strategies in peacemaking and peacebuilding in the next five days in Antipolo, Rizal. It is hosted by the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process and co-sponsored by Ekta Parishad (India) and CESCI (Switzerland).
#WomenMakeChange

Groundbreaking the Bangsamoro Roadmap for Peace: Dialogue with IP and Moro Women

September 21, 2016 – Groundbreaking the Bangsamoro Roadmap for Peace: A Dialogue with Moro and IP Women A consultation with the Moro and IP Women on the Bangsamoro Roadmap for Peace was held in Barangay Ilian, Esperanza, Sultan Kudarat on September 21, 2016. The program aims to give the women of Brgy. Ilian a meaningful participation in the crafting of the new enabling Bangsamoro law.

Ms. Helen Rojas, OIC Head Secretariat of National Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security (NAPWPS), emphasized that women’s participation in the peace process is important. “Dapat madaming babae ang may partisipasyon sa usaping pangkapayapaan,” she said OIC Head Secretariat NAPWPS Helen Rojas. The Bangsamoro women also shared their thoughts, inputs and insights on the implementation phase of the Bangsamoro peace process. #TayoAngPagbabago #TayoAngKapayapaan

By | September 22nd, 2016|Gallery, NAPWPS, Photos|0 Comments

Brief Remarks of Irene M. Santiago on #WomenSeriously, the Global Campaign on Women, Peace and Security

Brief Remarks of Irene M. Santiago | Lead Convener, #WomenSeriously, the Global Campaign on Women, Peace and Security | Launch of the Women’s Peace Tables Worldwide
Dublin, Ireland; 10 September 2016

“Talk to me, not about me”. That is the powerful message on the opening page of the web site of our campaign. For in spite of numerous Security Council resolutions and endless advocacy by women and men of goodwill from around the world, women’s equal and full participation in all political efforts to resolve numerous conflicts has been either completely absent or grossly insufficient . Women’s participation and voices continue to be marginalized notwithstanding the existence of volumes of well researched and persuasive documentation to support both the value and critical role women play in preventing, stopping and resolving violent conflicts. Your own former President Mary Robinson, a staunch advocate for women and their critical role in peace, has said: “We have seen first-hand in countries from every region the critical role women play as peace-builders, as community organizers, as voices for those who are marginalized. We are convinced that strengthening women’s leadership at every level is key to advancing peace, sustainable development and human rights in the 21st century.”

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By | September 11th, 2016|NAPWPS, News|0 Comments

Women, Peace and Security: A Study on the Initiatives to Implement United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325

Women, Peace and Security: A Study on the Initiatives to Implement United Nations Security Council Resoluti… by Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process on Scribd

Women Leading Peace

The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security released a foundational new research report entitled Women Leading Peace: A close examination of women’s political participation in peace processes in Northern Ireland, Guatemala, Kenya, and the Philippines. The report examines women’s political participation in peace processes, focusing on four distinct cases where women have gained access to high-level negotiations. This study provides a comprehensive understanding of not only why and how women mobilized for peace, but also how they shaped negotiations and their outcomes.

Women Leading Peace by Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process on Scribd